“Open Legacy” as a minimal standard for future editions of Olympic Games and YOGs


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Title of the Project: “Open Legacy” as a minimal standard for future editions of Olympic Games and YOGs.

Idea Owner: Alvaro Herrero. Undersecretary of Strategic Management and Institutional Quality

Project idea in a couple of sentences: During October 2018 Buenos Aires City hosted the Young Olympic Games (YOGs). From the beginning, it was taken into account that big sporting events raised many concerns about corruption and misuse of public funds. Thus, as part of the organization committee of the games the City took a commitment to follow an open and transparent process. We think this is a framework that future host cities should consider as minimal when planning this kind of events. So the propose challenge is to develop some kind of device ( Guidelines, Alliance, Checklist, Task force, Standard, etc) to promote and ensure that all future Olympic Games deliver an “open legacy”. Finding a way to mark a clear path /roadmap to help cities that will host these kind of events to embrace an open government perspective since the begging of the project, and make sure they will be able to deliver information in open standards, especially the ones related to infrastructure projects, funding, contracting, procurement and sponsorship.

The story behind the project: During 12 days more than 4.000 athletes competed on 32 disciplines at the Olympic Village and in other parks of the city, in the 3rd edition of the summer Youth Olympic Games. As the mayor have said, this were the first games with gender equality, the first time they were entirely organized by a government entity and the first time the games were open to the public. All the information we opened about the organization of the games is available at legadoolimpico.buenosaires.gob.ar.

As this were the first games fully funded by a public entity, it was highly important to ensure the transparency and accountability of the whole organization process. The Youth Olympic Games required the construction of many different infrastructure, like stadium, pools, tracks, apartments, courts. It was decided to only build what it could be reuse later and avoid any “white elephants”. From the beginning, it was taken into account that big sporting events raised many concerns about corruption and misuse of public funds.

We want to find a way to make this standard to be the cornerstone for future events and continue to improve it. If we revisit the processes, the data, and the way it was communicated to the public, we will find many lessons learned that could be valuable for cities planning the events, and for the civil society demanding transparency and openness. Also we hope you to identify things that could be improved in future editions of the YOGs and Olympic Games.

Challenge relevance: Open contracting (Transparency of Major International Event Budgets)